Barry Wilson is campaigning for roadworks signs to be removed from highways when actual roadworks are not taking place

April 6, 2021

A Woodford man – who describes himself as a “retired activist” – has launched several e-petitions concerning the D’Aguilar Highway which he hopes South Burnett residents might consider signing.

Barry Wilson was formerly a member of the Rivermouth Action Group in Brisbane, which campaigned on local issues, before retiring and moving to Woodford.

He told southburnett.com.au his daughter lives in Nanango, so he regularly travels up and down the D’Aguilar Highway to visit her.

He’s getting frustrated by what he’s encountering during his travels so he’s putting his “activist” hat back on.

Mr Wilson’s four D’Aguilar Highway petitions, all on the State Government’s official E-Petition website, have been sponsored by the Clerk of the Parliament:

  • Queensland residents draw to the attention of the House the designation given to the D’Aguilar Highway between Caboolture and Kingaroy which reduces funding for upgrades, repairs and maintenance. This State Highway is a vital traffic route in our state and with ever increasing traffic this road is somewhat being neglected by government funding. Your petitioners, therefore, request the House to take immediate action to ensure the rebuild and resurface of the D’Aguilar Highway, especially where potholes continue to occur and where the highway is repeatedly patched.
  • Remove speed limit signs when no road works are taking place: Queensland residents draw to the attention of the House recent changes made in South Australia to their legislation (Road Traffic [Miscellaneous] {Roadworks} Variation Regulations 2021) reported in The South Australian Government Gazette dated Thursday, 4 March 2021 No 14 page 825 which comes into effect on 5 April 2021. This will now require traffic control companies to remove/cover speed restriction signs when no roadworks are actually taking place in the area. South Australian Government will now be imposing $1250 fines on such companies. Your petitioners, therefore, request the House to take immediate action to introduce and pass similar legislation into Queensland Parliament but to also include not only Traffic Control Companies but also developers and TMR and their contractors and give consideration to other changes within the above mentioned Regulation in this matter. 
  • Increased overtaking lanes on D’Aguilar Highway:  Queensland residents draw to the attention of the House Queensland Transport’s neglect of the D’Aguilar Highway and motorists’ safety which exists between Caboolture and Kingaroy.  With only several overtaking lanes along its entire length of 164km in either direction and very limited areas where overtaking can safely occur which are also then limited because of oncoming traffic.  Most overtaking lanes are that short that only one vehicle is able to pass/overtake a slow vehicle making other vehicles wait behind for many more kilometres before another opportunity to safely pass slow vehicles arises. Your petitioners, therefore, request the House to take immediate action to fund and install multiple new overtaking lanes in both directions along its entire length and increase the length of existing short ones as a matter of urgency for the safety of all motorists.
  • Cyclists must use cycleways when they exist and not narrow highways/roads adjacent: Queensland residents draw to the attention of the house that cyclists are obstructing motorists by not using purpose-built cycle paths when they exist adjacent to existing narrow roads and highways. This puts both cyclists and motorists in danger. Your petitioners, therefore, request the House to take immediate action to pass legislation including on-the-spot fines where cyclists ride on narrow roads and highways without cycle lanes where a purpose-built cycle lane exists adjacent.

Mr Wilson said the fourth e-petition was sparked by an incident where cyclist was on the D’Aguilar Highway had traffic crawling behind him, instead of using a nearby bike path.

“I just couldn’t overtake him legally,” Mr Wilson said.

He said when it was legal to overtake, there was traffic coming in the opposite direction, leaving the highway traffic banked up.

Mr Wilson has previously campaigned successfully against street signs being located where drivers could not see them, and for the replacement of damaged or faded traffic signs.

The four D’Aguilar Highway petitions are open until August 31.


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2 Responses to "E-Petitions Target D’Aguilar Highway"

  1. Bouncer  April 7, 2021

    “I just couldn’t overtake him legally,” Mr Wilson said.

    If Mr Wilson checks the current road rules he will find that drivers are permitted to go over unbroken lines if it is safe in order to overtake cyclists and maintain the 1 meter or 1.5 meter distance from the cyclist depending on the speed limit on that section of roadway.

    https://www.qld.gov.au/transport/safety/rules/other/cyclists

    “Crossing lines to pass a bicycle rider

    To pass a bicycle rider—as long as it is safe to do so—you are allowed to:

    drive over centre lines (including double unbroken centre lines) on a 2-way road
    straddle or cross a lane line (including a continuous lane line) on a multi-lane road
    drive on a painted island.

    If it is not safe to pass a bicycle rider, you must wait until it is safe to pass.”

    Hope this helps others who may have also been stuck behind cyclist.

    Reply
  2. Bouncer  April 7, 2021

    Regarding “…remove/cover speed restriction signs when no roadworks are actually taking place in the area.”

    I feel this depends on the condition of the road. In many locations there are no lines marked and lanes may be reduced in width with very limited verge, which may also have been dug out. Also, often there are loose stones which of course can be thrown into windscreens and or cause tyres to lose grip.

    Overall, I feel its safer to apply the reduced speed limits in the majority of cases, unless the roadworks are almost completed and the roadway is in such a condition that higher speeds would be considered safe.

    Reply

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